Attack the Block

(2011)

Genres: Action, Comedy, Sci-Fi

Hot and Now: Attack the Block & Kuroneko

Transcript for Hot and Now: Attack the Block & Kuroneko

 

CHRISTY:
Alright, now it's time for Hot and Now where we each pick a film that you can watch at home. My Hot and Now pick is "Attack the Block," a mix of two genres that might not sound like they'd make a whole lot of sense together -- the alien-invasion thriller and the teen-stoner comedy. But the result is one of the most original and entertaining movies I've seen all year. It follows one weird night in a South London housing project, and how the kids who live there prepare for battle when creatures start falling from the sky.
 
This is the first feature from writer-director Joe Cornish, and it has a low-budget, let's-put-on-a-show energy about it that's infectious. The young actors are all unknown, which adds to the raw realism of their interactions. And the fact that we never really see the creatures up close -- we just see their glowing green teeth -- makes "Attack the Block" genuinely frightening and intense. At the same time, this movie is really a lot of fun, with its dry British humor in the face of absurd danger. "Attack the Block" came out this week on Blu-Ray and DVD.
 
IGNAITY:
You’re right.  It is a lot of fun. I really enjoyed “Attack the Block” as well.  Well, Halloween is coming up, so I thought I would pick an appropriately creepy film for Hot & Now.  It's a great ghost story from 1968 that's just finally been released on DVD. KURONEKO--which means BLACK CAT--is a highly stylized horror movie set in 16th century Japan about two vengeful female spirits who lure and kill samurai.
 
Photographed in inky black-and-white, KURONEKO moves like a deliberate, dream-like dance. It's a film about ghosts that's so enigmatic and unsettling that it could almost be a ghost itself.  KURONEKO was written and directed by Kaneto Shindo, who is also responsible for the similarly harrowing ONIBABA, which I'd also recommend checking out. KURONEKO just came out in a very nice edition from Criterion.  It’s the first time it’s been available on dvd.