Bridesmaids

(2011)

Genres: Comedy

Review: Bridesmaids

Transcript for Review: Bridesmaids

CHRISTY LEMIRE:

I'm Christy Lemire of the Associated Press.

IGNATIY VISHNEVETSKY:

And I'm Ignatiy Vishnevetsky of mubi.com. Our first movie is BRIDESMAIDS, the latest from producer Judd Apatow. Kristen Wiig stars as Annie, a neurotic Milwaukee confectioner whose boyfriend left her when her cake shop went out of business. Stuck in a no-strings-attached relationship with a wealthy sleazeball and living with two very unpleasant roommates, Annie has only one bright spot in her life: her best friend Lillian, played by Maya Rudolph.

Clip 3 / "Lillian asks Annie about her night"

IGNATIY:
Lillian's wedding is being planned by her new friend Helen, a prim trophy wife played by Rose Byrne. Annie constantly tries to outdo Helen -- and usually embarrasses herself in the process. 
 
Clip 1 / "First class"
 
IGNATIY:
While ruining every aspect of Lillian's wedding -- from the engagement party to the bridal shower to the bachelorette party -- Annie keeps running into a charming Irish immigrant working as a police officer. He's played by Chris O'Dowd.
 
Clip 5 / "Officer Rhodes" 
 
IGNATIY:
BRIDESMAIDS is a comedy of elaborate social missteps. Now, some of the gross-out material doesn't work  -- especially one scene involving a bridal shop and food poisoning. But the movie's best moments are the long drawn out scenes where director Paul Feig, a veteran of such TV shows as THE OFFICE and ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT, lets the brittle Helen and the nervy Annie play off each other, piling on passive-aggressive comments and faux pas. It feels cringe-inducing and often very, very funny. 
 
CHRISTY:
Yeah, thumbs up for me, I had a blast here and I love that that kind of raunchy, fearless Judd Apatow style humor is all for women as well.  This is not a chick flick, and I hate that phrase.  It's for women and men.  It does not need the gross out scene in the bridal store.
 
IGNATIY: 
No, it definitely doesn't.  It feels like it doesn't belong with the rest of the humor, which tends to be, you know, all about social discomfort and kind of characters saying the wrong thing. 
 
CHRISTY: 
Right.
 
IGNATIY: 
And that, that scene just seems completely out of place.
 
CHRISTY: 
Right, no the film is smarter and more clever and has more charm than that.  And this feels like, I don't know, like a really  obvious attempt to appeal to the lowest common denominator and bring everybody in possible.  We don't need it.  Having said that, Melissa McCarthy, who is sort of the center of the most ridiculous gross-out part of the gross-out scene is hilarious throughout the entire thing.  And she is weird, and there is darkness to her character and there is a real fearlessness.  Kristen Wiig, though, can really do everything. 
 
IGNATIY:
I'm really surprised because I usually find her kind of grating.
 
CHRISTY:
Really?
 
IGNATIY: 
I find her very, very grating on Saturday Night Live.
 
CHRISTY: 
Hmm.
 
IGNATIY:
Here she comes off, I think,  as a lot more, a lot more real than she does in kind of the, well, obviously skit characters aren't as well developed. But here, there is something grounded in reality.  I really like the relationship that she has with Maya Rudolph's character.  That feels very real and very organic to me
 
CHRISTY: A lot of it feels real.  I think more than most women would like to admit in terms of the jealousy and some pettiness.  We all kind of want to take the high road, but, I don't know, the kind of thing creeps in far too often, so that hit the nail on the head in that regard.  And Kristen Wiig co-wrote script.  We should say that, too.  Okay.