Jack and Jill

(2011)

Genres: Comedy

Review: Jack and Jill

Transcript for Review: Jack and Jill

CHRISTY LEMIRE:
Okay, next up is "Jack and Jill," the latest Adam Sandler comedy, which shockingly was not shown to us in time for last week's episode. So we get the joy of playing catch-up. Sandler seems to be borrowing from Tyler Perry here, dressing up in drag to play both Jack, a Los Angeles advertising executive, and Jill, his obnoxious, clueless, passive-aggressive twin sister.

Jill was only supposed to be visiting from New York for Thanksgiving, but ends up staying much, much longer. She tags along with Jack and his family on a European cruise, which provides yet another opportunity for episodic slapstick humor and hideous wardrobe choices.

But the real reason Jack is letting Jill stick around so long is because Al Pacino -- yes, that Al Pacino -- is smitten by her. Jack wants to use Pacino in a Dunkin Donuts campaign -- and there's a ridiculous amount of product placement in this movie -- so he's hoping Jill can help seal the deal.

That joke right there and one other funny line from Pacino are the only ones that made me laugh out loud. Meanwhile, the rest of the packed theater was silent. But during a lengthy scene in which Jill has diarrhea after eating chimichangas for the first time, the place went nuts. By now we've come to expect the gross-out humor, jarring shifts in tone and illogical editing. It's when Sandler tries to get all gooey and sentimental that his movies are truly offensive. But hey, between this and "Just Go With It," at least he makes it easy to compile a worst-of list at the end of the year. Thumbs down.

IGNATIY:

I think you hit the nail right on the head.

CHRISTY:

Didn’t I, though?

IGNATIY:

The problem with this movie with a lot of Sandler’s movies; it’s not the humor. I mean obviously humor is a subjective thing. Some people find certain things funny. Some people don’t. It’s the cheap, unearned sentimentality. That’s really what makes these bad movies bad and extremely sloppy filmmaking. Um, but here I mean the Jill character is such a hideous cartoon. I mean the movie goes so far to turn her into this barely human thing that when the movie tries to play up some sympathy for her, it feels completely disengenuous.

CHRISTY LEMIRE:

Right, all of sudden this is 180. We should all embrace her. I have to say, though, Adam Sandler is pretty convincing as a woman. I believed him like with the makeup. Like with Tyler Perry you know it’s a big obnoxious cheesy drag. Adam Sandler looks like a woman.

IGNATIY:

Do not speak ill of Tyler Perry. At least Tyler Perry’s movies are funny.

CHRISTY:

But Adam Sandler looks like a woman; like you could see her on the subway on the 6 train in the Bronx. She looks like an actual person which is shocking to me. Al Pacino here is actually pretty funny. I mean making fun of himself, making fun of his volatility; he’s not bad here.

IGNATIY:

I think it’s a bad sign when the best part of a movie is like the low point of someone’s career.