Like Crazy

(2011)

Genres: Drama, Romance

Review: Like Crazy

Transcript for Review: Like Crazy

 

CHRISTY LEMIRE:

Okay, and now we move on to a weepy note with the doomed romance, "Like Crazy," which won the dramatic grand jury prize at this year's Sundance Film Festival. Anton Yelchin and Felicity Jones star as a couple of L-A college students who fall in love and quickly start making scrapbooks and furniture for each other. 

 
But because Jones' character, Anna, is British, she's only in the U-S on a student visa. She knows she's supposed to go back to London, if only for a couple of months, but that's too long for her to stay away from Yelchin's character, Jacob. They're young and in love, the rules shouldn't apply! So she sticks around all summer with some serious consequences.
 
The rest of director and co-writer Drake Doremus' film follows the various text messages and terse phone calls, missed connections and misplaced anger that keep these two kids from finding happiness. But they're so annoying when they're together, the times they're apart are actually more tolerable. Jacob, for example, starts dating a co-worker played by Jennifer Lawrence, which seems like a vast improvement.
 
Yelchin and Jones have some chemistry at the start -- they're both giddy in the halcyon glow of first love. Maybe the romantic notion that they're meant for each other is misguided. And the more "Like Crazy" forces them to keep reentering each other's lives, the more mopey, whiny, frustrating and self-indulgent the film feels. I am baffled as to why this movie is so well regarded. Thumbs down from me.
 
IGNATIY: 
I don’t hate this movie um however I don’t think it’s very good.  It’s really problematic.  For example, the Jennifer Lawrence character, whose treated really unfairly by this film.
 
CHRISTY: 
And the second she shows up it’s like movie is over.  You can date Jennifer Lawrence now.  She’s beautiful and cool and this great fun party girl.
 
IGNATIY:
And they seem to be great for each together, but the movie keeps trying to force them back together.  Even as their relationship becomes less and less convincing actually.  It a…
 
CHRISTY: 
What’s left? 
 
IGNATIY: 
There’s absolutely nothing left except this foolish idea that they are supposed to be together.  It’s like they’re crazy.  
 
CHRISTY: 
You know and maybe I’m too much of a pragmatist because I’m looking at like you guys are young.  You had a nice time.  Go date other people.  This is a learning experience for you, but the fact that she was just stupid and selfish in the very beginning by staying in the U.S.
 
IGNATIY: 
It’s true. Yeah, the device, the device completely ruins her character.  
 
CHRISTY: 
Yeah.
 
IGNATIY: 
Because she’s either, you know, she’s over staying her visa by two months.  I mean she can just go back to the UK, she’ll get another visa.  She’ll come back.  The only two reasons she could do it is either because she’s really really dumb or she you know has this over powering sense of privilege that you know this immigration law isn’t actually ever going to apply to her.  
 
CHRISTY:
Either way it makes it very hard to root for her.
 
IGNATIY:
It makes her character really unlikable, yeah.
 
CHRISTY: 
And root for them to be together.
 
IGNATIY: 
And then the movie keeps trying to root for their relationship, but it doesn’t make a very convincing case that this should be a love story
 
CHRISTY: 
But it makes a lot of mix tapes.