The Green Hornet

(2011)

Genres: Action, Crime, Comedy

Review: The Green Hornet

Transcript for Review: The Green Hornet

CHRISTY:

Our next film is "The Green Hornet," based on the 1930s radio show.
It comes from director Michel Gondry, who's known for visually inspired films like "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" and "The Science of Sleep." Here, he directs Seth Rogen -- yes, that Seth Rogen -- as Britt Reid, a playboy who transforms himself into a vigilante crime fighter.



CLIP 6 – take my hand


CHRISTY:

That's Taiwanese pop star Jay Chow as Kato, and actually, Kato is the brains of the operation -- he comes up with all the cool gadgets, tricks out their cars, and does most of the heavy-duty fighting.



CLIP 4 – kato vision


CHRISTY:

Although he has lost some weight, this is Seth Rogen doing yet another version of his schlubby, wisecracking persona. He doesn't have the acting chops of, say, a Robert Downey Jr. to give this superhero character any depth. And "The Green Hornet," plays out like a Judd Apatow-style bromance, masquerading as an action movie -- and a depressingly generic one at that, all by the numbers. And I saw it in 3D, which did not help this thing at all. 3D is useless here, as it always is.

IGNATIY:
Oh, I completely disagree. They use 3D during superimpositions, and, uh, kind of, fade-ins, which you never see, and it’s a really weird affect to see, to see, like a fade-in in 3D, because you have two different, kind of, planes of vision meshing together at the same time. I think that’s really inventive, and in a way, almost very beautiful. There’s also this odd sequence where we’re kind of inside the Seth Rogen character’s head, where he’s, like, figuring out this whole back story involving another character –

CHRISTY:
Oh, yeah, with his father, right.

IGNATIY:
-- yeah, and there are all of these kind of weird optical printing style effects, that are obviously done digitally, but kind of go back to the heyday of optical printing in the 70s and 80s, but that look really wonderful in 3D.

CHRISTY:
And that’s the only – well, maybe one of two sequences, perhaps, that have the Michel Gondry stamp on them.

IGNATIY:
Really?

CHRISTY:
I think that anybody could have directed this film. This is someone that is so talented –

IGNATIY:
I completely disagree. Because, I think people tend to think of Gondry as, essentially, like, a technical, inventive director, and it’s true that he’s a very – you know, that he has a great imagination. But he’s also a very good director of actors, and he’s very good at creating, kind of, this relaxed atmosphere between two leads. I think that’s the key to his romances, and it’s also the key to something like, BE KIND REWIND, which this resembles, in many ways.

CHRISTY:
But Rogen and Jay Chow have NO chemistry. He’s doing that thing, crazy Fozzy Bear thing –

IGNATIY:

Whoa! I completely disagree. I completely disagree.

CHRISTY:
Jay Chow is, like, coolly efficient. And they should – you should want to be in that car with those guys. You should be itching to go along for the ride with them. They never work together for me. That whole “bromance” thing –

IGNATIY:
I completely disagree. I think they have a very unusual chemistry, but it works.