Up

(2009)

Genres: Adventure, Animation, Comedy

Nell Minow: 3D for Kids

Transcript for Nell Minow: 3D for Kids

IGNATIY VISHNEVETSKY:
But first, here’s our contributor Nell Minnow as she takes look at 3D from the parent’s perspective.
 
NELL MINOW:
More and more kids’ films are being made in 3D today. That is because animators have the most control and can rotate the objects completely, whether it’s in computer animation or stop motion animation. Pixar is making all of their movies in 3D.
 
The best of these films avoid distracting tricks like things coming at you from the screen or dangling in front of your nose in favor of a more subtle, immersive sensation. One really great example was last year’s Disney film, “Tangled,”  which had a scene with floating lanterns that was really magical. 
 
In “Up,” the animators contrasted the two main characters through their contours. Mr. Fredricksen, the crabby old guy, was very square, and everything about him and everything he owned was very square, but Russell, the little boy, was very oval shaped even his backpack was oval shape.  And they also told the story through the 3D effects. When they’re inside the house it was a little closed in and claustrophobic but, when they went outside, the 3D effects gave you sense of distance and expanding vistas.
 
3D us most effective sometimes when you’re least aware of it. Sometimes it can be very distracting. But, when it is used well it can really help a good movie be great. I loved “Coraline,” which had beautiful 3D effects.  And in “Despicable Me,” there are some great 3D jokes over the closing credits.  

Before you shell out the extra money to see a 3D movie, just check and make sure that it was actually filmed in 3D and that the 3D effects were not added later in post-production. In movies like “The Last Airbender” and “Alice in Wonderland,”  those post production 3D effects just dim and distort the picture. 
 
Even the best 3D can be overwhelming for kids.  It can even make them feel dizzy, and I generally don’t recommend 3D for anybody under the age 7 or 8.  Be careful, too, about theaters. Some theaters misalign the projectors so that the picture splinters if you tilt your head just a little bit.
 
You know what’s more fun than watching 3D movie with kids?  Is teaching kids how to make their own 3D images and there are a lot of great resources on the web that will show you how to take two pictures and make them look like one 3 dimensional image. We’re going to put some links of those on our website ebertpresents.com.
 
CHRISTY LEMIRE:
Thank you so much, Nell. And you know, she is so right. Kids do dig 3D. When I saw CARS 2, I met very cute little girl afterward and I said, “Did you like it?” and she just had the biggest smile on her face. She was like, “Yeah!” So, you know, it’s a colorful and shiny and stuff pops out and it’s fun.

IGNATIY:
I like colorful, shiny things popping out at me.

CHRISTY:
There you go, and you’re much older than that aren’t you?