White Irish Drinkers

(2010)

Genres: Drama

Review: White Irish Drinkers

Transcript for Review: White Irish Drinkers

CHRISTY LEMIRE:
Ok, our next film is "White Irish Drinkers," which I was surprised to learn is not a documentary about my family. It is, however, a low-budget and highly cliched look at working-class Brooklyn in the mid-1970s.  Director John Gray's film is about two brothers -- the sensitive artist, played by Nick Thurston, and the confident thug, played Geoffrey Wigdor. Stephen Lang is their abusive, alcoholic father.

Clip 6 -- You don't come home tonight

CHRISTY:
The two come up with a plan to rob the theater where Thurston's character works on the night of the Rolling Stones concert. But he also finds time for a romance with his high school crush, played by Leslie Murphy.

Clip 7 -- This makes you special

CHRISTY:
"White Irish Drinkers" is fully of hammy acting, thick accents, and tedious, expository dialogue. At one point, the brothers' white, Irish friends stop drinking for a moment to announce that they are indeed white ... Irish ... drinkers. Thurston’s got a couple of decent moments with Karen Allen, who plays the family's long-suffering matriarch. But the real crime here is that you have Allen in the same movie as Peter Riegert, who plays the theater owner -- and they don't share a single scene. You've got Katy and Boon from "Animal House" together and you don't take advantage of it? Thumbs down on that alone.

IGNATIY VISHNEVETSKY:
Peppering or shall I say salting all of the dialogue with random expletives doesn’t make it more authentic it actually makes it more contrived.

CHRISTY:
Every other word is “F” 

IGNATIY:
Every other word begins with an “F”…

CHRISTY:
Yes.

IGNATIY:
You know I normally kind of like these sort of modest genre movies, but this is just marinating in its own mediocrity you know. 

CHRISTY:
And alliterative to boot, nicely done.

IGNATIY:
Yeah, alliterative…it’s so bad I had to alliterate.  No there’s absolutely nothing that…its seems like it’s a copy of a copy of a copy.  You know and if you go back far enough you’ll find Mean Streets or something, but this is like sub you know early 90s Scorcese knock off, knock off. And it’s just you know, it’s like if you just had a recording of someone saying like “my bruddah!” and looped it 2 hours, that would be this film.

CHRISTY:
B-r-u-d-d-a-h.  Bruddah.